Toasting the Man Chicago Almost Forgot, Nelson Algren

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NALGRENOn March 29, the Nelson Algren Committee will host the twenty-fifth annual Nelson Algren Birthday Party to honor the man who eternalized Chicago’s “drunks, pimps, prostitutes, freaks, drug addicts, prize fighters, corrupt politicians, and hoodlums” with his books “The Man With the Golden Arm,” “Neon Wilderness,” and “Chicago: City on the Make.”

This year would mark Algren’s 106th birthday—which actually falls on March 28—but  the festivities planned are lively: theater mainstays Donna Blue Lachman and Bob Swann will be presenting Algren’s work with folksinger Mark Dvorak, filmmaker Tom Palazzolo, actor-director Nate Herman, activist Robert Lopez, and novelist Christopher Corbett. Poetry readings, excerpts from the in-progress documentary, “Nelson Algren: The End is Nothing, The Road is All,” and a tribute to Algren’s lover Simone de Beauvoir. Read the rest of this entry »

Newcity’s Top 5 of Everything 2013: Lit

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Top 5 Books from Chicago Authors in 2013
“Little Known Facts” by Christine Sneed
“Don’t Kiss Me” by Lindsay Hunter
“Chicago By Day and Night” by Bill Savage and Paul Durica
“The Distancers” by Lee Sandlin
“Raven Girl” by Audrey Niffenegger
—Naomi Huffman

Top 5 Live Lit Series
WRITE CLUB
The Paper Machete
Guts and Glory
Tuesday Funk
Essay Fiesta
—Naomi Huffman Read the rest of this entry »

Diary Duel: Malcolm X Interests Sue on Publishing’s Eve

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Diary of Malcolm X coverBy Jeff Gilliland
Another wrinkle has emerged in the twisted tale of “The Diary of Malcolm X.” Shortly after our November 14 cover article—“Necessary Means: ‘The Diary of Malcolm X’ and the Fight for an American Legacy”—went to print, attorneys for some of Malcolm’s heirs brought a copyright infringement lawsuit against the book’s publisher, Third World Press. Filed in the District Court for the Southern District of New York, the complaint accuses Chicago-based Third World Press of entering into an unlawful agreement with the editors of the “Diary,” and repeatedly ignoring requests to cease from publishing the text. On November 8, presiding judge Laura Taylor Swain issued a temporary restraining order on the release of the “Diary,” which has been extended until preliminary arguments can be heard in January, 2014. The plaintiff in the lawsuit is X Legacy, LLC, a legal entity created by five of the six Shabazz sisters in 2011 “to protect, consolidate, and enhance the value of the assets and properties relating to the beneficiaries of…Malcolm X.” According to the text of the suit, the sisters formed the limited liability corporation to prevent any member of Malcolm’s family from unilaterally licensing or exploiting his assets without permission from the rest of the heirs. When third sister Ilyasah Al-Shabazz entered into a publishing contract with Third World Press, the suit alleges, she did so without X Legacy’s consent and without “any ownership rights or authority…to copy, publish, or disseminate the Diaries.” Read the rest of this entry »

Necessary Means: “The Diary of Malcolm X” and the Fight for an American Legacy

Chicago Publishers, Memoir, News Etc. 1 Comment »
Photo: Marion S. Trikosko, 1964

Photo: Marion S. Trikosko, 1964

By Jeff Gilliland

On April 15, 1964, a passenger jet touched down in Cairo and a tall, lean black man stepped out into the glaring sun. His travel documents read “Malik El-Shabazz,” but to many of those who glimpsed their reflection in his horn-rimmed glasses that day, he was known by another name: Malcolm X. The famed black nationalist and civil rights leader was fresh off his contentious split with the Nation of Islam, which he had helped grow from a small religious sect headquartered in Chicago to a nationwide movement for economic and social empowerment. Now he was on his way to make the Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca that marks one of the five pillars of Islam. Though he may not have known it at the time, the voyage Malcolm began that day would profoundly alter his religious beliefs and racial philosophy—bringing him out of the shadow of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad, and establishing a legacy that continues to this day. Read the rest of this entry »

Publish or Perish? Literary Variety Show Spooks and Inspires

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shadowpuppet1Start your Halloween celebration off with The All Hallows’ Eve Eve Variety Show at the California Clipper­, an intimate bar with its own resident ghost. All proceeds from the show benefit one of Chicago’s newest literary institutions, the Chicago Publisher’s Resource Center (ChiPRC). ChiPRC founder John Wawrzaszek opened the center earlier this year as a way to support all things publishing-related.

Over email, John says that his goal for the center is “to cover all areas of publishing since that definition has been growing.” He went on to describe ChiPRC, located at 858 North Ashland, as “an accessible and affordable space that allows the community to complete publishing-based projects. It offers resources that are physical such as equipment needed to self-publish work or educational such as workshops that focus on craft and process.” Read the rest of this entry »

Raw Material: Guts & Glory Probes Vulnerable Work in a Never-Boring Way

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Guts&Glory(1)Nearly a year ago, writers Keith Ecker and Sam Irby created the literary series Guts & Glory to give authors an environment to try out their newer, riskier writing. “While the [live lit] community had really flourished, I noticed that there wasn’t a venue for artists to share their most vulnerable works. I personally had topics I wanted to explore in my writing that I knew would push the envelope of what would be considered acceptable at a lot of shows,” Ecker says.

If starting a live literary series is the thing to do these days,  what sets this one apart from the rest? First of all, the environment. The series takes place once a month in what Ecker calls the “barebones venue” in the back of Powell’s Bookstore. Christmas lights are hung along the exposed brick wall, creating a raw, intimate environment for the readers and its audience. “We aren’t about big production value. We’re about that connection between the artist and the audience in its purest form. And because of the incredibly supportive atmosphere that Sam and I have fostered, our artists feel comfortable being incredibly vulnerable and our audiences are eager to listen,” Ecker says. Read the rest of this entry »

Shelf Life: O’Gara & Wilson Moves to Smaller Town, Bigger Promise

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O'GARAWILSON

After more than fifty years of selling books in Hyde Park, Chicago’s oldest used bookstore, O’Gara and Wilson Ltd., will soon move to Chesterton, Indiana, located an hour east of the city. Current owner Doug Wilson, who began working for Joseph O’Gara as an apprentice in 1972, believes the move will keep the struggling store alive. Last year, Wilson was forced to use his personal savings to help float the store due to competition with e-books and online markets, but he believes the localized economic boom within the small town of Chesterton is promising.

Almost forty years ago, Wilson began his career scouting books for O’Gara. At least 2,000 used books lined the shelves in the Salvation Army, and amidst the sea of worthless book club novels and discarded Reader’s Digests, Wilson rediscovered books worthy of a second look. This process of scouting led Wilson to O’Gara’s bookstore in the early seventies. He began selling used books to O’Gara, once receiving $40 for finding a book written by the man who killed Billy the Kid. He bought that book on a whim for 50 cents. Soon, O’Gara saw Wilson had a gift for finding books, and offered him an apprenticeship. Read the rest of this entry »

The Need to Be Heard: 2nd Story Promotes Equality Through Expression

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By Kathleen Caplis OzziePride2012

He’d had a long ride home from Chicago, performer Ozzie Totten explained during 2nd Story’s sixth annual PRIDE event. His friend’s dad, Harvey, was traveling for business and offered him a ride home to Minnesota, and Totten, at the time a student at Loyola University, saw it as a free and easy way to travel back home for winter break. Totten had identified as gay since age fifteen, grew up in an accepting atmosphere, and always felt welcome in his home, his community, his church. But on that car ride home, it became apparent that not everyone felt comfortable enough to be openly gay in their community.

As Totten took his shift behind the wheel, Harvey began to talk of his past visits to Chicago—to see his boyfriend. Before this, Totten saw Harvey as a happily married man, but he realized he had been holding a secret, and now Totten had no choice but to keep the revelation from Harvey’s daughter, with whom he was close friends, for fear of splitting their family apart. It placed Totten in an uncomfortable situation. He understood Harvey’s apprehension; he’d heard stories of friends being kicked out of their homes after coming out. But Harvey chose not to come out to his family for several decades. Reflecting on that car ride home, Totten now understands Harvey’s need to tell someone, anyone—to have his story heard. Read the rest of this entry »

Event Preview: Applied Words: “Broken Windows”/Guild Literary Complex

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PaulD

Paul Durica

(This event  has been POSTPONED. Click here for rescheduling details.)

The Guild Literary Complex introduces its newest production, Applied Words, on Tuesday, July 9, with the first of three performances planned between now and October; this one, called “Broken Windows,” kicks off the “urban design”-themed reading series. The special event invites writers to muse on stories of specific Chicago social and communal sensibilities that have originated and evolved from their relationship with their surrounding material environment.

Designed to translate urban design into a defining language of our city, “Broken Windows” brings wordsmiths to a free public stage for audience members to consider, learn and digest the social history behind the mortar, metal, conflict and politics of where a community lives and works. According to Guild’s website, the “Broken Windows” engagement aims to narrate the human factor that’s at stake behind “community ailments such as trash, graffiti and loitering” through the literary arts. Read the rest of this entry »

Lit 50: Who Really Books in Chicago 2013

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NEWNEWCITYIt’s been a deadly year for Chicago writers, with the passing of Roger Ebert, Richard Stern, David Hernandez and, just last week, Father Andrew Greeley. Not to mention the dead-woman-walking status achieved by Rachel Shtier, whose ill-conceived New York Times Book Review takedown of Chicago turned her into this city’s most universally disliked resident since, perhaps, John Wayne Gacy. So a sense of what we’d lost pervaded the creation of this year’s Lit 50, this time around celebrating not so much the writers who occupy the center stage, but those who operate behind the scenes to make sure the stage itself exists. The process, as excruciating as it is, always renews our optimism for the literary Chicago that carries on, bigger and better every year, even diminished by its inevitable losses. This year’s increasingly long short-list reached new magnitudes, with 360 folks under consideration for just fifty nods. Needless to say, a slight tilt in another direction, and an entirely different Lit 50 could have been created. But so it goes. (Brian Hieggelke)

Written by Brian Hieggelke and Naomi Huffman, with Greg Baldino and Kathleen Caplis. See previous years here. Read the rest of this entry »